FAMILY SYSTEMS THERAPY

Family systems therapy is a form of psychotherapy. Family systems therapy is in line with “systems thinking,” as it views the family as a system or unit. This unique therapy helps individuals resolve their problems within the context of their family. This is done by evaluating each part of the system (or family) in relation to the system’s total functioning.

Family systems therapy proposes individual behavior is influenced by, and inseparable from, the family of origin. What happens to one person in a family, happens to all people in that family. The family is a vital part of an individual’s network of social support. This approach aims to nurture positive change, growth, and development within families.

THERAPY DEVELOPMENT

Dr. Murray Bowen, a popular 20th century psychiatrist, developed family systems therapy. Bowen held the belief that all therapists experienced familial challenges of their own. This could help normalize the experience of others.

Bowen went on to suggest the importance of addressing an individual’s broader relationship system in terms of structure and behavior. Furthering this notion, Bowen positioned that behavioral changes in one part of the system (or one family member) would likely have an impact on the way the system (or family) functions as a whole.

THEORY CONCEPTS

DIFFERENTIATION

Differentiation of self is a primary concept to Bowen’s approach. This refers to how much a person is able to separate his or her thoughts, feelings, and responses from that of the system. A person with low level differentiation experiences emotional fusion due to inadequate boundaries.

FAMILY PROJECTION PROCESS

The family projection process refers to the transmission of parental anxiety, relational struggle, or emotional issues to the child.

EMOTIONAL TRIANGLE

The notion of the emotional triangle signifies the importance of three-person systems. This is a way to mediate the anxiety that may present itself in a two-person dyad. Yet, some triangles can produce their own anxiety, especially when two sides are in harmony with one in conflict. This occurs when a child becomes triangulated within the parental relationship.

EMOTIONAL CUTOFF

This refers to the emotional distancing of one family member. It is a way to manage the emotional struggles of the family system. Some may seek emotional distancing as a way to decrease relational stress levels or strains. Unfortunately, this can increase tension and difficulty for the emotionally cutoff individual. The person places more pressure on other relationships to meet emotional needs.

SIBLING POSITION

The most well-known concept underlying family systems therapy is sibling therapy. There are specific roles within each family based on whether a person is the youngest, middle, or oldest child. For example, the eldest child may be expected to act in a “parental role” within the family system.

MULTIGENERATIONAL TRANSMISSION PROCESS

Bowen’s belief that individuals with a similar level of individuation seek one another out. Because of this, certain behaviors may be passed through generations. This means a couple, where both individuals have a high level of differentiation, are likely to have children with even higher differentiation levels.

SOCIETAL EMOTIONAL PROCESS

The concept of societal emotional process demonstrates how things that affect the family’s emotional system also affect society’s emotional system.

NUCLEAR FAMILY EMOTIONAL PROCESS

This concept reflects Bowen’s belief that a nuclear family will often experience struggles in four areas: intimate partner conflict, problem behaviors in one partner, impaired functioning in children, or emotional distancing.

USES

Family systems therapy has been widely used in the treatment of numerous behavioral and mental health issues for families, couples, and individuals. While family systems therapy can be used in a wide range of situations, it has shown to be effective in families with teenagers. The adolescent and teen years can be difficult, not only for the teen, but the entire family. This is common for families who have a teen struggling with mental illness. Dealing with a teenager with a mental illness requires total family involvement. Family systems therapy can be very helpful in facilitating the necessary family changes.

WHAT TO EXPECT

Starting family therapy can be an intimidating endeavor. For some, it is helpful to have an idea as to what to expect. Your experience with family systems therapy involves working with the family as a whole and individual members.

In the first session, the therapist or counselor will likely conduct an assessment. He or she will identify who each member of the family system is, and note key information such as:

  • Conflicts
  • Alliances
  • Triangles
  • Violence
  • Sexual abuse
  • Substance use
  • Traumatic losses and/or deaths

Identifying these familial dynamics can help bring coherence and understanding to the identified problem(s) within the family.

Throughout the course of therapy, the family systems therapist will facilitate therapeutic conversation by asking each family member to speak directly to him or her. This allows the other members to listen and hear what the person is saying, without being able to emotionally react. Bowen described this technique as externalizing the thinking of each individual in the presence of the other.

THE ROLE OF THE THERAPIST

A family systems therapist role involves connecting with the family without becoming emotionally reactive. Therapists are cautioned against acting as a mediator. Instead, they maintain a “differentiated” view, while investigating and sustaining interest. This allows the family to gain an understanding and awareness of themselves as an emotional system.

Bowen’s family systems therapy can be useful in attending to the complex systemic patterns present in all families. Through observation and facilitation, family members gain a better understanding of individual roles. They will learn how to play a part in the problem. And how, by working in a cohesive manner, to experience positive growth and change.

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